Moon Lake, by Joe R Lansdale (Mulholland Books, 2021)

A young writer returns to his childhood hometown to reinvestigate his father’s suicide and his mother’s disappearance. A touch of Stephen King, East Texas-style, in this standalone novel which balances investigative thriller and the gothic with this writer’s concern for probing the underbelly of prejudice. Plenty to enjoy here: a solid, professional job all around from a modern master.

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My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Falling, by TJ Newman (Simon & Schuster, 2021).

His family taken hostage, an airline pilot is commanded to crash his plane. Commendably brisk and straightforward old-school aviation thriller full of plausible cabin detail and with most tropes of the aircraft jeopardy subgenre cheerfully put to work. Tailor-made for a movie adaptation: make sure you read it before the film comes out.

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My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Grendel, Kentucky, by Jeff McComsey & Tommy Lee Edwards, with Giovanna Niro and John Workman (AWA Upshot, 2021)

The leader of an all-woman biker gang returns home to avenge her father’s death. Swift, gory, fun riff on Beowulf populated by backwoods weed farmers and take-no-shit Kentuckians. The book anthologizes a four-part graphic story: there’s hell of a movie to be made of this. A straightforward thing done as well as it might be. Recommended.

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My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Scene of the Crime, by Ed Brubaker, Michael Lark & Sean Phillips (Image Comics, 1999/2021)

A young San Francisco private eye’s missing persons case turns out to be more complex than it originally appears. This fresh paperback collection of a four-part comic from 1999 preserves a smart contemporary noir-ish story that doesn’t overstay its welcome and which pleasingly plays around with genre and location-specific tropes. Well worth your time.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Write It In Blood, by Rory McConville & Joe Palmer, with Chris O’Halloran and Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou (Image Comics, 2021)

Hitmen brothers are working on getting out, but matters go South, Texas-style. Very effective visually-driven neo-noir working within genre expectations to produce something that’s both distinctive and affecting. Lots to enjoy here if this is your kinda thing. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

The Long-Legged Fly, by James Sallis (No Exit Press, 2012)

Episodes in the New Orleans life of an occasional PI, repo man, and (mostly) functioning alcoholic. The first Lew Griffin mystery works as a prequel to the series, establishing the fictional detective’s bona fides. Something of a meta-novel about crime writing and experience, the book’s a cracker, with character and atmosphere aplenty. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

High Crimes, by Christopher Sebela & Ibrahim Moustafa (Image Comics, 2019)

A Himalayan climbing guide moonlighting as an Everest graverobber stumbles across secrets for which a shadowy agency will gladly kill. Zippy thriller blending international spy-jinks and guilty past narratives with authentic-feeling mountaineering content. Plenty to appreciate and enjoy here. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Criminal, Vol. 1: Coward, by Ed Brubaker & Sean Phillips (Titan Books, 2007)

A career thief gets in over his head with a security truck heist. Collecting issues 1-5 of Criminal, this first collection tells a sharp downbeat noir tale with a touch of heart and depth to its characters. Plenty to relish here for genre fans, and for readers of the likes of Westlake/Stark’s Parker novels. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

More Better Deals, by Joe R Lansdale (Mulholland Books, 2020)

A used-car salesman with an eye for opportunity gets in over his head with a woman. Lansdale’s new stand-alone novel is a beauty, a 1960s-set noir of the old school, and all the better for doing so, in taking a classic situation and treating it with respect. Laconic and spry as ever, Lansdale serves up another southern-fried treat. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.