The Cigar That Fell in Love With a Pipe, by David Camus & Nick Abadzis [trans. Nick Probst] (SelfMadeHero, 2014)

A fable involving Orson Welles, Rita Hayworth, a seaman’s pipe and a fabled cigarmaker. An odd but charming bit of magical realism. Not quite sure what to make of it, but enjoyable both in the story and in its execution, and in its passion in detail terms.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

I Killed Adolf Hitler, by Jason (Fantagraphics Books, 2006)

A hitman is hired to travel back to 1938 via time machine to kill Hitler. Deadpan SF black comedy in the author/illustrator’s signature style, which deftly explores the potential for complications in the premise. There’s depth in the approach; appreciating the deceptiveness of the apparent simplicity of Jason’s work is part of the pleasure.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

 

Spider-Man Noir: The Complete Collection, by David Hine, Fabrice Sapolsky, Carmine di Giandomenico and others (Marvel, 2019)

Spider-Man’s origin, and his clashes with the Green Goblin, Otto Octavius and others, retold with a 1930s setting. Fun reworking of existing ideas and characters, with a nod to the Spider-Verse. Accessible for newbies like me – which helps – and gleeful in its mashup of Expressionism and PI tropes. Not essential, but diverting.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

 

 

 

A Face in the Crowd, by Stephen King & Stewart O’Nan (Hodder & Stoughton, 2012)

A widower fancies that he can see faces from his past in televised baseball games. Perhaps for King completists, this is nevertheless a melancholy and effective stand-alone story that doesn’t require a knowledge/love of baseball for it to work; we’ve all got regrets, after all.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

The Possession, by Michael Rutger [AKA Michael Marshall Smith] (Zaffre, 2019)

A documentary crew investigating mysteries associated with a remote Californian town find their sanities threatened. Excellent horror/thriller hybrid, with returning characters from the same author’s The Anomaly. As ever, Rutger/Marshall Smith is expert not only at persuading you of the impossible but in keeping those same horrors in the shadows. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Wanderers, by Chuck Wendig (Solaris/Rebellion, 2019)

As a flu-like plague sweeps the world, a small number of sleepwalkers congregate to cross America. Pacy and with some fine characterisations, and a neat eye for contemporary America, the central conceits of this King/Crichton hybrid don’t quite hold. Well-written enough to keep pages turning though; a cautious recommendation.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.