Blue Moon, by Lee Child (Bantam Press, 2019)

Reacher, in helping an old man with a debt problem, sparks a gang war. A larger canvas than typical this time out, and perhaps more cinematic in scope. Plenty of positives for series fans and for admirers of Child’s prose style, though not an entry point for newbies Recommended, nevertheless, if this is your kinda thing.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

The Night Fire, by Michael Connelly (Orion, 2019)

Ballard and Bosch investigate a cold case murder fule brought to Harry by the widow of his mentor. The 22nd in the sequence (also involving lawyer protagonist Mickey Haller) is a confident, detailed, and crisp yarn packed with the author’s customarily authoritative procedural detail and empathy for his leads. Recommended. 

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper, by Hallie Rubenhold (Transworld, 2019)

Biographies of five women united by their links to an infamous series of killings. Enthralling corrective to a century-plus of sensationalist coverage dismissive of the victims. Some lapses into journalese and guesswork at times, but this is nevertheless an accessible, necessary and fascinating book rightly giving those murdered due to their lives.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Spider-Man Noir: The Complete Collection, by David Hine, Fabrice Sapolsky, Carmine di Giandomenico and others (Marvel, 2019)

Spider-Man’s origin, and his clashes with the Green Goblin, Otto Octavius and others, retold with a 1930s setting. Fun reworking of existing ideas and characters, with a nod to the Spider-Verse. Accessible for newbies like me – which helps – and gleeful in its mashup of Expressionism and PI tropes. Not essential, but diverting.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

 

 

 

Prison: A Survival Guide, by Carl Cattermole and others (Ebury/Penguin, 2019)

Prisoners’ perspectives of the UK penal system; what it’s really like on the inside, and where to get help. An invigorating, detailed and illuminating read, that’s critical but fair-minded in its assessment of what life in jail is like, and on what works (not much) and what doesn’t. Recommended.

My own books here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.