Doctor Who: The Eaters of Light, by Rona Munro (BBC Books, 2022)

The Twelfth Doctor, Bill, and Nardole find themselves north of Hadrian’s Wall, where Picts and Romans are in conflict. A very solid novelization, with the space to breathe that its TV progenitor didn’t quite have. Author (and original screenwriter) Munro’s affiliation with the subject – and inspirations such as Sutcliff’s The Eagle of the Ninth – shines through.

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My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Doctor Who: The Fires of Pompeii, by James Moran (BBC Books, 2022)

The Tenth Doctor and Donna Noble find themselves in a Roman city overlooked by a volcano. Zippy novelisation of Moran’s own television script from 2008. Effectively translates the TV episode to short novel length without resorting to padding. Some good jokes along the way too. Fun for fans, and accessible as an entry point.

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My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Doctor Who: Dalek, by Robert Shearman (Target Books, 2021)

The Ninth Doctor and Rose Tyler intercept a cry for help from near-future Earth, where a psychopathic billionaire has amassed a museum of alien technology. A brisk, effective expansion of Shearman’s own Dalek episode of Doctor Who from 2005. Retains the feel of the original, developing character without compromising the pace of the story. Lots of fun. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

The Institute, by Stephen King (Hodder & Stoughton, 2019)

A 12-year-old boy genius with latent telekinetic abilities is kidnapped and held at a secret research station. A knowing and occasionally satirical low-key novel; as usual, the ending is the issue, though there’s huge amounts of pleasure in this mix of folksy Americana, paranoid SF and character study. Fun for author fans.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Wanderers, by Chuck Wendig (Solaris/Rebellion, 2019)

As a flu-like plague sweeps the world, a small number of sleepwalkers congregate to cross America. Pacy and with some fine characterisations, and a neat eye for contemporary America, the central conceits of this King/Crichton hybrid don’t quite hold. Well-written enough to keep pages turning though; a cautious recommendation.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Alien, by Roger Luckhurst (BFI/Palgrave, 2014)

An overview of the 1979 Ridley Scott-directed space horror movie. And a fine thing too, discussing the project’s inception, its plot and its main characters (Jones the cat included). Engages well with existing criticism of the movie; a fine addition to the series and to the discussion of Alien and its sequels.

My own books here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.