The Reddening, by Adam LG Nevill (Ritual Limited, 2019)

Two sets of investigations into people lost along a remote stretch of Devon coast coincide. Once it settles down, this delivers in terms of cults, sacrifices, hippy rock stars gone feral, and some effective images. More Cthuloid than folk in its horror, and possibly offputtingly-overwritten; some ripe red glee to be had nevertheless.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Alien 3: The Unproduced Screenplay, by William Gibson, Johnnie Christmas and Tamra Bonvillain (Dark Horse, 2019)

Hicks, Newt, Ripley and Bishop are rescued after the events of Aliens; however, a xenomorph has also survived. Gibson’s unused – and very respectful of the series -screenplay is given a sprightly rendering as a graphic novel. An interesting sidenote to the wider franchise, and a fun SF/horror adventure in its own right.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

 

Past Tense, by Lee Child (Bantam Press, 2018)

Jack Reacher investigates part of his family history; trouble ensues. The 23rd Reacher novel is business as usual, with writing as lean, muscular and efficient as its protagonist. The parallel narratives are well-handled, and even if the bad guys’ plan is easily-guessable, there’s plenty to enjoy. Series fans won’t be complaining.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

 

A Face in the Crowd, by Stephen King & Stewart O’Nan (Hodder & Stoughton, 2012)

A widower fancies that he can see faces from his past in televised baseball games. Perhaps for King completists, this is nevertheless a melancholy and effective stand-alone story that doesn’t require a knowledge/love of baseball for it to work; we’ve all got regrets, after all.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.