Richard Stark’s Parker: The Outfit, by Darwyn Cooke, adapted from the novel by Richard Stark (IDW Publishing, 2016)

A criminal hits back at an organised crime syndicate, via a series of heists. As with its predecessor, this is a smart, dark adaptation of its source material, splendidly capturing the original while being strong enough to remain impressive in its own right. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

Richard Stark’s Parker: The Hunter, by Darwyn Cooke, adapted from the novel by Richard Stark (IDW Publishing, 2012)

New York 1962: a left-for-dead heist operator seeks revenge and the money he’s owed. Fantastic graphic novel adaptation of the Stark/Donald E Westlake thriller. Cooke’s swift dark style and his monochrome renderings capture the prose well, giving the tale a brutal cinematic sweep. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

Eight Million Ways to Die, by Lawrence Block, John K Snyder III, and Frank Cvetkovic (IDW Publishing, 2018)

A graphic novel adaptation of Block’s fifth Matthew Scudder mystery. And a splendid thing it is too, distilling the book expertly, and conveying it in great noir imagery. Here’s hoping other Scudder books get the same treatment from this team. Recommended (as is the source novel series).

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

The Hitcher, by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas (Arrow Books, 2018)

A monograph on the 1986 road movie/horror hybrid, patterned after the approach of the BFI Classics series. While there’s some interesting material on pre-production and casting, this is not a good effort. Variable writing and editing, with assertions rather than arguments cluttering the thin text. Unfortunately, I was disappointed.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

GBH, by Ted Lewis (No Exit Press, 2018 [Sphere, 1980])

Then: George Fowler’s criminal empire crumbles. Now: Fowler’s in hiding, dreading the inevitable, haunted by what he did in retaliation. Excellent, bleak, and brutal neo-noir that’s as adept with the grime of the porn industry as it is with the low-key menace of out-of-the-way seaside towns. Lots to admire in this final novel from Lewis, newly-reissued.

My own books here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

 

The Reddening, by Adam LG Nevill (Ritual Limited, 2019)

Two sets of investigations into people lost along a remote stretch of Devon coast coincide. Once it settles down, this delivers in terms of cults, sacrifices, hippy rock stars gone feral, and some effective images. More Cthuloid than folk in its horror, and possibly offputtingly-overwritten; some ripe red glee to be had nevertheless.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Blue Moon, by Lee Child (Bantam Press, 2019)

Reacher, in helping an old man with a debt problem, sparks a gang war. A larger canvas than typical this time out, and perhaps more cinematic in scope. Plenty of positives for series fans and for admirers of Child’s prose style, though not an entry point for newbies. Recommended, nevertheless, if this is your kinda thing.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

The Night Fire, by Michael Connelly (Orion, 2019)

Ballard and Bosch investigate a cold case murder file brought to Harry by the widow of his mentor. The 22nd in the sequence (also involving lawyer protagonist Mickey Haller) is a confident, detailed, and crisp yarn packed with the author’s customarily authoritative procedural detail and empathy for his leads. Recommended. 

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Past Tense, by Lee Child (Bantam Press, 2018)

Jack Reacher investigates part of his family history; trouble ensues. The 23rd Reacher novel is business as usual, with writing as lean, muscular and efficient as its protagonist. The parallel narratives are well-handled, and even if the bad guys’ plan is easily-guessable, there’s plenty to enjoy. Series fans won’t be complaining.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.