The Reddening, by Adam LG Nevill (Ritual Limited, 2019)

Two sets of investigations into people lost along a remote stretch of Devon coast coincide. Once it settles down, this delivers in terms of cults, sacrifices, hippy rock stars gone feral, and some effective images. More Cthuloid than folk in its horror, and possibly offputtingly-overwritten; some ripe red glee to be had nevertheless.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Alien 3: The Unproduced Screenplay, by William Gibson, Johnnie Christmas and Tamra Bonvillain (Dark Horse, 2019)

Hicks, Newt, Ripley and Bishop are rescued after the events of Aliens; however, a xenomorph has also survived. Gibson’s unused – and very respectful of the series -screenplay is given a sprightly rendering as a graphic novel. An interesting sidenote to the wider franchise, and a fun SF/horror adventure in its own right.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

 

Blue Moon, by Lee Child (Bantam Press, 2019)

Reacher, in helping an old man with a debt problem, sparks a gang war. A larger canvas than typical this time out, and perhaps more cinematic in scope. Plenty of positives for series fans and for admirers of Child’s prose style, though not an entry point for newbies Recommended, nevertheless, if this is your kinda thing.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

The Night Fire, by Michael Connelly (Orion, 2019)

Ballard and Bosch investigate a cold case murder fule brought to Harry by the widow of his mentor. The 22nd in the sequence (also involving lawyer protagonist Mickey Haller) is a confident, detailed, and crisp yarn packed with the author’s customarily authoritative procedural detail and empathy for his leads. Recommended. 

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper, by Hallie Rubenhold (Transworld, 2019)

Biographies of five women united by their links to an infamous series of killings. Enthralling corrective to a century-plus of sensationalist coverage dismissive of the victims. Some lapses into journalese and guesswork at times, but this is nevertheless an accessible, necessary and fascinating book rightly giving those murdered due to their lives.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Odeon Relics: Nineteen-Thirties Icons in the Twenty-First Century, by Philip Butler (Art Deco Magpie, 2019)

A photo-book of the surviving Art Deco cinemas originally built for the Odeon chain. A lovely bit of social history; each image is presented with a brief overview of the building in question’s life. Some continue as movie houses, others are bingo halls, are derelict, churches, shops, nightclubs. As the book indicates, fewer than half of the 140 built remain, and none of them are unchanged.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.

Spider-Man Noir: The Complete Collection, by David Hine, Fabrice Sapolsky, Carmine di Giandomenico and others (Marvel, 2019)

Spider-Man’s origin, and his clashes with the Green Goblin, Otto Octavius and others, retold with a 1930s setting. Fun reworking of existing ideas and characters, with a nod to the Spider-Verse. Accessible for newbies like me – which helps – and gleeful in its mashup of Expressionism and PI tropes. Not essential, but diverting.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England.