Catwoman: Selina’s Big Score, by Darwyn Cooke with Matt Hollingsworth (DC Comics, 2002)

Desperate to earn, Selina Kyle takes on a risky big heist opportunity. Pacy graphic novel in Cooke’s typically confident noir-inflected style, operating also as a precursor to his Richard Stark/Parker adaptations. Explosive and with an emotional heart, this is lots of fun.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

 

Barking, by Lucy Sullivan (Unbound, 2020)

A struggle with mental health issues leads to Alix’s institutionalisation; she’s locked in with her demon. A fascinating case study of illness and the inadequacies of mental health provision, taking the metaphor of the black dog and running wild with it. Barking has a lot to say, being told in expressionistic sketches that mirror Alix’s situation. Maybe harrowing for some, but recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

Richard Stark’s Parker: Slayground, by Darwyn Cooke, adapted from the novel by Richard Stark (IDW Publishing, 2018)

An armoured car job goes awry; Parker hides out in an out-of-season funfair. The fourth and final volume in this series of adaptations maintains the high series standard. Sleek, visual and retro, and effortlessly lean. Comes with an additional short story, The Seventh.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

Richard Stark’s Parker: The Score, by Darwyn Cooke, adapted from the novel by Richard Stark (IDW Publishing, 2017)

Parker is talked into an audacious series of heists across the same town on the same night. The blend as before in this third excellent adaptation: sleek modernist visuals, terse dialogue, brutal action. A fourth volume – Slayground – soon followed.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

Richard Stark’s Parker: The Outfit, by Darwyn Cooke, adapted from the novel by Richard Stark (IDW Publishing, 2016)

A criminal hits back at an organised crime syndicate, via a series of heists. As with its predecessor, this is a smart, dark adaptation of its source material, splendidly capturing the original while being strong enough to remain impressive in its own right. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

No Direction Home, by Nick Quantrill (Fahrenheit Press, 2020)

Former Hull PI Joe Geraghty finds unwanted trouble in Amsterdam. A sharp stand-alone short story – and a precursor for a new Geraghty novel in 2020 – that works as a fine entry point to the series and its author’s work. The first of Fahrenheit Press’s Fahrenzine imprint of lo-fi zine-style limited edition noir chapbooks, designated #FHZ001. A series to watch.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England

 

The Shining [Devil’s Advocates], by Laura Mee (Auteur Publishing, 2017)

A monograph on the Stankey Kubrick adaptation of the Stephen King novel. And a good one too; a smart, detailed and perceptive commentary on the movie, its production and its reception. Academic but accessible, and even-handed in its analysis of the continuing significance of the movie as a popular culture touchstone. Recommended.

My own books are here, if that’s your thing. Newest is noir thriller East of England